Turtle, Ecuador

Your words, not ours

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Your Words - We tell it like it is! Holiday Reviews by previous Exodus travellers  

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  • Reviewed September 2018
    Clive and Jean Parsons

    A Great Adventure

    As described, the itinerary encompasses a tremendous range of activities, venues and experiences which provided insights into the country's culture, history and heritage. We met many interesting people along the way and had great fun with fellow travellers and guides. As usual with Exodus trips there were many early mornings and some long journeys, but these are necessary for the trip to achieve the stated aims! Hotels were comfortable and all had suitable amenities. Food - and drink - was plentiful and tasty and generally good quality. The route was well planned and enabled us to fully acclimatise before attempting the focal activity for us - the Inca Trail. It also put the trail and Machu Picchu into a broader context so that we appreciated it all even more. Support on the Inca Trail, from our guide and 'porters' was exceptional. We had a great time and thoroughly enjoyed (almost) every minute.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Walking the trail, arriving at and visiting Machu Picchu was the real culmination as that was our main objective, but was heightened as a result of what we had experienced on the trip beforehand. There was magnificent scenery in many places, but especially at sunset and sunrise on the trail. Condors soaring overhead in Colca Canyon were also awe inspiring.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Mike was exceptional. His knowledge enthusiasm and passion for his country and its cultural heritage added a whole extra and very special dimension to the trip. He ensured that everything was very well organized and he managed individual needs particularly well - especially on the Inca Trail. He also ensured that we got full benefit from other local guides and anyone else supporting the trip, such as porters and drivers. There was a real feeling of one team dedicated to helping us to get the most from the trip. He also engendered a real sense of 'family' for us trippers. All this with a 'wicked' sense of humour!

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Money - we didn't have any need for US dollars. Credit cards were usable in most restaurants. Credit and debit cards gave a far better exchange rate than cash in the UK - especially if you have a fee free card. Climate / Weather - didn't really get a feel for the temperature range from the trip notes and most towns got colder earlier than anticipated. Inca Trail - the packing list for the trail possibly over complicated requirements. Also trip notes were not clear that you need stuff for six days allowing for the night in Ollantaytambo before (as well as the night in Aguas Calientes after) - but you can leave things in the lodge at Ollantaytambo and pick up on return. It is worth doing aerobic activity beforehand as the altitude on day 2 had experienced walkers puffing!

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    Other companies often have a different schedule for the 4 day Inca Trail. The Exodus model suited us perfectly and we often had the trail seemingly to ourselves. If you are thinking about doing it - just go for it!
  • Reviewed August 2018
    Anthony Child

    A wonderful way to see Peru's highlights

    We went on this trip in July which is the Peruvian winter. This tour lasts for around 3 weeks and for the majority is packed with a full itinerary. You start at Lima, known locally as 'Donkey Belly' because it is always cloudy due to the local topography and weather systems. To be honest Lima is OK but a typical capital city with usual buildings of interest and you really don't need to spend much time there. We did however get our first sample of the local Peruvian alcoholic drink - Pisco Sour. A brandy based drink made from the skin of grapes. It is one of Peru's best kept secrets. You must try it! Hotel clean and functional. From Lima we were driven in a coach that had more room than needed for our party of 14 which would see us all the way through to Cuzco. We needed space as the trips can be long and some folks felt a bit nauseous. The two drivers were lovely chaps and couldn't do enough for us. Exodus always provide large boxes of water for each leg of the journey and is always needed. From Lima you then head off down the coast on day 3 to visit Pachacamac Fortress an Inca coastal settlement. . Interesting enough and a good place to take photos of the settlement which is dry and dusty. This a good taste of the first of many Inca sites throughout the trip. Afterwards on to the coastal resort of Pucusana where we had lunch and a boat trip around the bay photographing the numerous pelicans. The food at the restaurants here and throughout the trip was of a high standard and most enjoyable. The hotel here was pretty basic and the rooms small. The following day we headed for another harbour for a high speed boat ride to the Ballestas Islands, which we understand has more sea birds per square metre than anywhere else in the world. If you have a telephoto lens then take it as the variety of birds is fantastic, including penguins. You can't get too close due to the rough sea and rocks but this excursion is truly spectacular. Can imagine folks could feel a bit nauseous if the sea is too rough, so keep looking at the horizon. Later we visit the Nazca lines from watch towers which is really needed to gauge the perspective of these unusual markings. The next day is pretty arduous as we travel inland across dry and sometimes windy uneven roads to Arequipa. A number of our party felt or were ill due to travel sickness on this 10 hour drive. We have a few short stops along the way which are greatly needed. The following day we discover this old city and are rewarded with some great photos of the surrounding dormant volcanoes and one live one. The city is very interesting and gives visitors a much better insight in to local Peruvian life and culture. The trip to the convent is very interesting. The hotel was very quaint but lovely with a huge atrium. The city square is well worth a visit for supplies and at night is pretty lively. On day 7 we visit the Colca Canyon, a spectacular drive along the edge of the valley. The famous Condors are the treat at the end! We leave fairly early after breakfast and are lucky as the thermals are starting just as we arrived. We saw these wonderful graceful birds in all their glory soaring time and time again. Use that telephoto if you have it. They are not the only birds as we also saw lots of other smaller varieties including the South American Large Hummingbird. This spectacular place was surreal, although if the weather is against you (as it was the day after) the Condors won't come out to play. The drive here to Chivay climbs high through the mountains and very bendy but had spectacular views. The hotel at Chivay was more basic but reasonable enough. Wifi here was poor and can be patchy at many of the hotels. Exploring the town here and the local market is relaxing way to spend the evening. Our guide as always will recommend places to eat. We didn't sample the hot springs but many of our party did and thoroughly enjoyed it. We had been put off by previous reports of lack of cleanliness but our group didn't notice anything untoward. The additional local tour guides that are picked up at each stage along the way add immensely to the enjoyment with them imparting their specialist insight to the region we visit. We rated all of them, all of whom had an excellent command of English. The next part of the trip was to travel to Puno on the edge of Lake Titicaca. We are climbing it seems all the time but stop regularly at view points and to see the wild Vicuna and Alpacas roaming the high plains. Puno is a thriving bustling City we plenty of sights and local amenities. The hotel and food here was very good with the central plaza a very popular place to spend some time. The next day we visit the Lake and board a boat that takes us to the Reed People who literally spend their lives floating on the lake on the reeds. Full of local tradition and colour you will be invited to spend some time with these people with ample photography opportunities. You finish off by taking a trip around the reed village in their own boats which would look more at home on a pleasure park, but great fun nonetheless. As you travel higher some travellers may start to feel the effects of altitude. We did take the recommended medication for this part of the journey and all the way through to Machu Picchu. We felt more fatigued than normal, so a more relaxed pace and plenty of fluids is the best solution. Another long coach journey but with more stops and less bendy all the way to the Inca capital of Cusco. We spend more time at Cusco than anywhere else but the hotel is ok but fairly basic. Maybe Exodus should look at an upgrade. My friend didn't do the Inca Trail and spent even more time there. If you are on the ground floor then there seems to be a lot of noise from staff and guests. Cusco however is a lovely City full of history and tradition. As always the central plaza is the main focus of the locals and truly worth an evening visit. The restaurants were also very good and you can try local dishes such as Alpaca or Guinea Pig. We visited the spectacular Sacred Valley and the fortress at Ollantaytambo, and a vibrant local market was well worth a visit . Take care not to take photos of the locals unless they are happy for you to do so. Many will ask for a Soles or two. The next part if the trip is the Inca Trail. Everyone will have wonderful memories of this but here is what we experienced. You start off early to get on the trial so the weather is chilly. You climb for most of the first 2 days then descend for the rest. We travelled in winter and at night it does get very cold and you are under canvas. We chose to take our own sleeping bags but I the ones you can get from Exodus are perfectly good with a warm liner. Unfortunately it did also rain for a couple of the days, which can drench you all the way through. Fortunately we had decent quality ponchos bought in the UK (you need them). The paths can get slippery so robust good quality hiking boots or shoes are a must. Walking Poles, I would thoroughly recommend for steadiness on uneven parts. The tents are waterproof enough although the ends did get wet and although the ground for the most part only had a slight incline you did slip down the tent during the night. Wear dry clothes at night (I wore thermals) especially if your day clothes are damp. You climb as high as 16,000 ft across Dead Woman's Pass (another group photo). The walk is a reasonable pace but due to the altitude a slow pace is best and the guides will keep this steady pace. The Porters and they were probably 25 of them just for our group, did an absolutely fabulous job, packing and unpacking each day, cooking really amazing food and just about seeing to everything. All the water is boiled and therefore clean, make sure you drink plenty. We took small bottles of concentrated juice from home as this helped mask the taste of boiled water. Just remember, you will get wet, you will get cold, you will get hot, so you need to pack for everything but the Porters will only carry 7kg of your kit. The rest is up to you and your day bag, so only take stuff absolutely necessary. All of your other luggage and suitcase will be waiting for you at hotel at the end of the trek. You get an enormous sense of achievement doing this walk but you will get out of breath especially on the way up. Along the way you visit some amazing Inca sites and you have regular stops for rest and refreshments. Exodus plan this very carefully. Although the trail is only about 26 miles, don't forget it's up and down all the time. The travel toilets are as you would expect basic, and only at camp. There are some loos along the way but not many. A trip to the bushes maybe called for but you must take you own paper and you cannot leave it in the bushes. Doggy poo bags probably good to take along. The night before the final day you stay very high up overlooking the mountains that lead to Machu Picchu. We had a lot of mist and cloud but when it cleared the spectacular scenery is breathtaking. On the final morning you say goodbye to the Porters who earn every Soles you tip them. They carry around 25kg each on their back and speed past you as they go the next site, sometimes wearing just sandals in the rain. As you cross the Sun Gate Machu Picchu comes into view in the distance. Nothing prepares you for this awe inspiring site. Forget the photos you've seen, this leaves you speechless. The group gather together for the usual group photo then proceed downhill to this famous Inca phenomenon. You spend quite a bit of time at the site taking photos but don't go in to the main part which is the plan for the next day. As you leave the site weary, smelly but elated you go on a switch back coach ride to Machu Picchu town. After being fairly remote walking in the mountains you are faced with a loud and huge swarm of day trippers. You have to queue for the bus which took us about 20 minutes. The hotel in Machu Picchu was fairly good although some in our group complained they had no hot water, which after 4 days under canvas would have been an extreme disappointment. The following day our Exodus guide Renaldi (Renny) took us on amazing historic guide of the Machi Picchu site. You just can't get enough photos of such an extraordinary and magical place. Nothing really prepares you for what you see. In a way everything is sort of an anti-climax after Machu Picchu but you still wonder at the marvelous scenery of this geographically varied country. The train back to Ollantaytambo through the deep valley was an excellent way to leave Machu Picchu. We then catch a minibus back to Cusco, a bit crampt as all the seats were taken up by the group. The next few days we 'come down' with a few more days in Cusco and visiting other Inca sites. The final part of the tour is a short flight from Cusco to Puerto Maldonado in the Amazon. You stay in lodges built on stilts and sleep under mosquito nets with no hot water (cold shower), but of course you expect this. After the dryness of the west coast and the elevation of the trek, the Amazon seems to be out of place in Peru. Whilst there we enjoyed the high speed river journeys, the late night Cayman spotting, the night trek in search of wild like and the boat trip on the lake catching Piranhas. Great sunsets along the river and the trek to the lake was very enjoyable. Saw some monkeys and plenty of birds but I guess we were hoping to see more wildlife. Just a final point of caution. On our flight back we landed in Cusco to pick up more passengers for onward to Lima. However at Cusco, the airline company Avianca in their wisdom, decide that the air conditions (too hot) would affect lift off and they offloaded some of the suitcases, some of which were from our party. It took some nearly 2 weeks to be reunited with their baggage with Avianca hopelessly not interested. It didn't detract however from a wonderful and memorable holiday.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Lots, but of course the Inca Trail and Machu Picchu itself. The Inca sites generally were breathtaking. Loved the boat trip to the Ballestas Islands. Colca Canyon and the Condors. The Reed People and the trip into the Amazon.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Renaldi (Renny) was a fantastic group leader, caring, considerate and compassionate. Everything worked like clockwork, with him on the phone at every point to ensure we would be met without hold-up. His knowledge was phenomenal especially concerning the Incas, Cusco and Machu Picchu. He had such a vast knowledge about everything Peru. He is a credit to his industry.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Weather: be prepared for everything from wet to hot to cold. Take layers for the trek that can be taken off. Wear good rainproof hiking shoes or boots. You need to grip. I slipped over a number of times on the descent even with good boots. Take a quality poncho. Walking poles a must. Take a good quality waterproof jacket to suit the season. It gets very cold at night on the hike. Cameras and phones can't be charged for 4 days on the hike, so take a spare battery or large battery charger. Caution, all batteries must be carried in hand luggage including from phones and cameras otherwise Avianca may offload your luggage. Headtorch a must for hike and Amazon Altitude sickness tablets Refillable water bottle Hat and sun screen - due to altitude very easy to get sun burn (I did) Sunglasses

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    The group we had ranged from 50-over 70 years of age. If you are reasonably fit with no health problems you can do the trek. You will get out of breath on the way up, but so did everybody. The Amazon part of the journey didn't add that much to the trip. Maybe suggest going deeper in to the amazon where we may see more wildlife.
  • Reviewed August 2018
    Rob and Fiona Batten

    A wonderful Peruvian adventure

    Make no mistake, this is not a holiday as such but a full-on early morning to evening priceless adventure and experience. If you are doing the Inca trail you will probably find yourselves with only a couple of half days spare. Not one moment of this will you ever regret - we can honestly say that it was of the best experiences in 40 plus years of travel. Every day was well organised and went as smoothly as any holiday as diverse as this one could do. The hotels were of a good standard, particularly for a third World country. As far as the Inca trail is concerned, we are in our mid sixties, reasonably fit and had no real problems completing it. The porters are just incredible and ran past us as we laboured up and down hills! The food on the trek was amazingly good and we all ate well.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Too many to list!

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Our group leader was Renaldi Chacca. After all our years of travelling we can honestly say that Rennie, as we called him, was the best we have ever known. This was a sentiment shared by everyone else in our group. His depth of knowledge about the history, culture, politics and all things Peruvian was truly amazing. He was by turns kind, sympathetic, humorous, efficient but firm when the situation required it. We felt that we were saying goodbye to a friend at the end of the trip.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    In July it snowed on the Inca Trail so go prepared for all conditions.
  • Reviewed August 2018
    Jane Barber

    Peru Explorer -

    A very special and well coordinated trip, crammed full with different places and experiences - from amazing and varied scenery, plants and wildlife to interesting Inca and pre-Inca history, plus the Inca Trail and Machu Picchu experience.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Our hard-working porters who amazed us everyday by setting off after us on the trail, carrying their enormous packs and by the time we finally arrived, not only clapped us in, but had warm drinks and tasty meals ready, and our tents all set up! In terms of what we experienced - amazing condors soaring on the thermals in Colca Canyon; the huge numbers of breeding Peruvian boobies and pelicans on and around the Ballestas Islands (not to forget the penguins); tarantulas and ghost spiders in the jungle, and brightly coloured humming birds in so many places - and finally the brilliant clear night sky in Nazca!

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Renaldi (Reny) was informative and helpful throughout and mindful of group members' different needs, particularly on e.g. long travel days where travel sickness affected some of the group. He gave us interesting insights to Peruvian life and culture and brought alive what we were seeing day to day in the countryside, villages and towns, as well as describing the challenges of a society in transition from a largely rural way of life to an urban one. He worked well with local guides, and all the guides we had were personable and well informed and made the places come alive.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    It's not really a holiday more an experience! Read the trip notes carefully - this holiday calls for stamina and resilience because of the early starts, long road journeys and the altitude changes. Once at altitude pace yourself - it's surprising how quickly you get out of breath! The Inca Trail length is moderate but the altitude make it tougher, plus Peru weather is more variable than it used to be. For example, although dry season, we had two days of rain on the Inca Trail. So go prepared for all seasons and seek your guide's advice on what's expected for the days you're walking.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    Generally having a briefing each evening for the following day, (along with a quick note of the start time for the day after that) worked well. The exception was arriving in Cuzco after a long day on the coach, complicated by the need to decant into a minibus to negotiate the narrow streets. It then came as a big surprise to find that we would in effect have to pack for the Inca Trail by breakfast time next morning. This generated more questions from the group than all the other briefings combined, before we got to a clear understanding about the logistics i.e. that we would need to pack an overnight bag for the hotel in Ollantaytambo as well as stuff for the trail, and have both of these on the bus for the day in the Sacred Valley. Ideally the trip notes would contain a clear bullet point summary to read in advance, or a handout given earlier on the trip, to make it clear that we leave the main luggage a day earlier than everyone anticipated.
  • Reviewed July 2018
    Suzanne Anderson

    Peru explorer - see everything!

    This trip was fabulous, there was just so much to see and do it really was amazing how much we crammed in. If you want a trip that shows you all of Peru then this is the one for you as you truly explore all of it. Its a long trip and i absolutely loved it!

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    For me the most inspirational part was walking the Inca Trail and arriving into Macchu Picchu. The hiking really felt like I was in deepest darkest Peru, I kept thinking I would bump into Paddington Bear around the next corner. There's loads to see along the trail and I never got bored, I even enjoyed the steps!

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Ollie was superb, very knowledgeable and constantly organising the next part of the trip, when people on the trip were suffering from altitude sickness he was so kind and caring and really supported those that suffered, he really earned his tip! Ollie totally knew his stuff and was happy to answer any questions or help any time at all. He was also very patient and level headed when he needed to be. A superb leader, i'd like to nominate him for an award!

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    This trip is full on and if you are planning to do the Inca Trail do not under estimate the difficulty of the hiking. Whilst this is perfectly doable even if you have some difficulties physically you really do need to train properly in order to get the most out of the walk for you and your fellow members of the group. I strongly recommend that you follow the training plan on the exodus website and work to the level 4 plan not level 3. Its the altitude that makes it harder. Make sure you take enough clothes to keep you warm on this trip as i was cold for most of it (particularly at night) :(

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    I loved this trip, I've wanted to go for 8 years so to finally get to visit and see everything I wanted to was amazing. Macchu Picchu is so special and quite amazing to see, if its on your bucket list don't hesitate.
  • Reviewed May 2017
    Eve Gentilhomme

    APX170407 Peru Explorer

    Very good holiday on the whole

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    The inca trail was my favourite, but I enjoyed the whole trip.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    One of the best. Very committed and did everything he could to make the holiday memorable. Very caring and devoted to the group

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Go for ir

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    I don't eat meat and had no problems during the whole trip.
  • Reviewed December 2016
    David Mayne

    Mr David Mayne

    An exceptional holiday experience, far surpasses anything I could have imagined. The history, sightseeing, enthusiasm of the guide, nothing was to much trouble for him. All the team at Exodus and individual guides I could not commend high enough.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Finally getting to the sun gate at Machu Pichu and seeing the fabled Inca ruins shrouded in mist for the first time, just awe inspiring. The porters also deserve a mention for all their hard work and some of those marvelous culinary delights they concocted. The bird life on the islands came a magical second.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Wilbert Ramos was a man apart from all others in turn informative, helpful , spiritual, non judgemental, kind. Unlike any other guide we have had in the past. This man was everything you could want in a leader. Words could not praise him highly enough. Special commendation should also go to our driver Nico who drove vast distances and got us all to our destination without any problems. Shandi who was our.second guide on the Inca trail was also a delight.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Do not fear South America as we initially did, instead embrace the country and all it has to offer The culture will astound you, and the friendliness of the people will live with you forever. It is different, it can, at times be maddening, but take it from me you will never experience such a rich and diverse quality of life than this holiday has to offer.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    Once again praise in abundance for Wilbert for making this holiday extra special, and the entire team of guides and porters who, without their help would have made this particular holiday well, - Just very good , but with their help exceptional.
  • Reviewed December 2016
    Martin Bilson

    Peru Explorer

    A truly wonderful experience packed with wonderful Inca history, fantastic scenery, wildlife, boat trips, train rides and a flight over the amazing Nasca Lines, walking the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu and ending the holiday in the Amazon Rainforest watching Macaws,Chameleons ,monkeys etc with the "buzz" of Forest life in your ears.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Walking on a misty day through the Inca Gate of the Sun to have the mist clear and reveal Machu Picchu in all its glory - magical.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    An inspirational leader with extensive knowledge of Inca history, the Peruvian way of life, flora and fauna and excellent organisational skills

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Do it if you can !
  • Reviewed October 2016
    Linda Killin

    Peru Explorer

    Brilliant overview of this country. It creeps into your heart over the days. It's people, history, culture, cuisine. A great trip well thought out.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    The Inca Trail for me was a personal highlight. Not having camped for over 30 years I was a wee bit apprehensive but the entire experience was magical. The porters are simply the best. Awakening each morning to a hot drink served at your tent was a great start to the day.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Our leader Fabricio was the best guide I've ever had on any trip including 2 previous Exodus adventures. He is amazing, knowledgable and passionate about his country.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    If your thinking about this trip I would definitely recommend it. One of the best experiences of my life. The trail is a great challenge in a wonderful part of the world. Definitely try the Pisco Sour too.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    I miss you Peru
  • Reviewed October 2015

    Peru Explorer - September 2015

    Exodus describe this trip as leisurely/moderate - it's not. Be prepared for lots of 6am starts, several very long days on the coach and very little free time unless you opt out of organised activities. The Inca Trail is tough going, particularly on days 1 and 2 when the combination of heat and altitude make it quite a slog. Conditions in the jungle are far more basic than described in trip notes.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Getting to the top of Dead Womans Pass on day 2 of the Inca Trail and knowing that it was mainly downhill from there to Machu Picchu.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Rene and the other local guides were very well organised and knowledgable. My only criticism would be that they tried to cram too much in and we often felt that we were racing round museums and sites without time to take in our surroundings. By the end of our trip I definitely felt Inca'd out!

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Read the trip notes before you go. Appreciate just how much of this trip will be spent sitting on the bus. Accept that the standard of hotel used by Exodus (and the hotel rooms allocated to Exodus guests) are perhaps poorer than could/should be. Use sols rather than US dollars (except for Nazca flight). Don't do souvenir shopping until Aguas Calientes or Cuzco markets. Accommodation in Amazon is very basic and rainforest walk in wellington boots is a lot of effort if you hardly see any wildlife. Book an extra day in Lima at the end of your trip so that you don't face a long journey home smelling of the jungle - we were up at 6am in jungle for 2 hour boat trip, 1 hour bumpy bus journey, flight to Cuzco from Puerto Maldonado, flight from Cuzco to Lima, 6 hours in Lima airport, 11 hour flight to Paris, 5 hours in airport then 1 hour flight back to UK when there had been almost no water in our jungle lodge shower

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    This was an unforgettable experience with many high points but best described as an adventure rather than a holiday.
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